Hoosick Falls Blood Samples Collected by Department of Health

The State Department of Health is collecting blood samples of residents who live in or near Hoosick Falls for a biomonitoring study that will measure the PFOA exposure in the area caused by the town’s recent water contamination.

The study will also compare the levels of PFOA in the blood of people in the area to individuals living elsewhere.

The State Health Department is scheduling blood testing events at the HAYC3 Armory in the Village of Hoosick Falls. People who are interested in participating should sign up here. You may also sign up by calling the NYS Department of Health at 518-402-7950.

People who sign up will then be called to schedule a time to come in for blood testing, as it is by appointment only.

Participants must sign a consent form and complete a questionnaire that details their potential exposure to PFOA.

NYS Department of Health Commissioner Howard Zucker reported how over 900 residents have signed up for the blood tests so far and they will continue administering the free blood tests in the coming days.

Residents of Hoosick Falls and other communities who believe they may have been impacted are encouraged to contact us at (585) 325-5150 or to complete a water contamination contact form.

Mobile Command Center Set up in Hoosick Falls to Help Residents with Insurance, Mortgage and Refinancing Issues

At the direction of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, the Department of Financial Services will set up a Mobile Command Center in Hoosick Falls to assist and provide information to residents impacted by mortgage-related events following PFOA contamination in Hoosick Falls water supply.

Feb. 16 & Feb. 17 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The Mobile Command Center
HAYC3 Armory
80 Church Street
Hoosick Falls, NY

https://www.governor.ny.gov/news/governor-cuomo-deploys-dfs-mobile-command-center-hoosick-falls-help-property-owners


Hoosick Falls Classified as Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Site

February 16, 2016

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) at concentrations exceeding established criteria has been found in Hoosick Falls water supply system and several non-municipal wells in the Town of Hoosick. NYSDOH has also identified lower concentrations of PFOA in private wells and other public water supplies in the Town.

A notice issued by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation showed elevated levels of PFOA  in groundwater at the site of Saint-Gobain on McCaffrey Street and classified Hoosick Falls as Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Site. 

Read the Full Notice http://www.dec.ny.gov/data/der/factsheet/442046class2.pdf 


Hoosick Falls Update: EPA Soil Sampling at Ballfields

CaptureThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it will be testing soil samples from three ballfields in the village of Hoosick Falls that are located near a possible source of the town’s recent PFOA water contamination.

The sample testing will determine if the PFOA that was released into the air in the past from local facilities also contaminated the soil on the village’s ballfields due to their close proximity to the suspected source. Testing the ballfields will also show if the area had been used for disposal in the past.

This test will consist of samples taken at seven different locations on the three fields, as well as their dugout and bleacher areas. These samples will be tested for PFOA, its related chemicals, and several pollutants. The results will determine if cleanup work is necessary in the area by comparing them to the EPA’s established standards.

The results of the soil testing are expected to come back between late March and early April. The EPA will hold a public meeting to announce the results and answer questions before the start of the baseball and softball season.

Additional information about the Hoosick Falls water contamination can be found here or on the EPA website.

Residents of Hoosick Falls and other communities who believe they may have been impacted are encouraged to contact us and complete a water contamination contact form.


Banks Suspend Granting Mortgages in Hoosick Falls

The Bank of Bennington and the Trustco Bank in Hoosick Falls have suspended granting new mortgages due to the area being contaminated with toxic chemicals.

Trustco Bank’s treasurer Kevin Timmons, who confirmed the report, says that before lenders can finance home, the property normally must have access to potable water. A standard test for potability includes testing for e-coli and other contaminants, but now perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) must be added to the list, which is the chemical that has been found at dangerous levels in Hoosick Falls’ water supply.

For the homes that are not on the public water supply, the bank requires that their private wells are tested before issuing their mortgage.

A temporary filtration system that will work to remove majority of the PFOA from the village’s water supply is set to be in place by the end of February. This system, along with the permanent filtration system anticipated to be completed in October, are being funded by Saint-Gobain.

Trustco and the Bank of Bennington have claimed that they will resume granting mortgages once the filtration system is in place and the public water supply is safe for cooking and drinking.

Read the full article here.

Residents of Hoosick Falls and other communities who believe they may have been impacted are encouraged to contact us and complete a water contamination contact form.


Stay Involved in Government’s Response to Hoosick Falls Crisis

doh logoAt the direction of New York’s Governor’s office, the state Department of Health (DOH) will maintain a steady presence in Hoosick Falls on a regular schedule, in part to answer any questions residents may have regarding the PFOA contamination of their water.  The DOH will also be able to address the remedial efforts of the state and federal governments, such as a blood testing program and other efforts to assess the extent of the harm caused by PFOA,.

Our clients, and all Hoosick Falls residents, are encouraged to make the most of this opportunity to learn about what the next steps are, and to be heard in the process. Community involvement is critical to a successful response to environmental catastrophes.

See the announcement here.