Hoosick Falls & Petersburgh Landfills Declared Potential State Superfund Sites

Department_of_Environmental_ConservationThe New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced this week that the municipal landfills in Hoosick Falls and Towns of Petersburgh and Berlin have been declared Potential State Superfund Sites.

These sites became eligible for potential placement on the State Superfund Site Registry after preliminary investigations discovered that the sites may contain PFOA, a chemical listed as a hazardous chemical by New York State.

Further investigation will look for evidence of hazardous waste disposed at the landfills and any resulting contamination that may pose a threat to public health or the environment.

“DEC remains committed to ensuring a comprehensive clean-up of the contamination in these communities,” said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. “Identifying these two landfills as P-sites is the next step in the state’s ongoing response to provide residents in these affected communities the information and protection they deserve.”

PFOA is believed to have been disposed at both landfills.

Monitoring wells at the Hoosick Falls site were found to contain concentrations of up to 21,000 parts per trillion (ppt) of PFOA, and samples at the Petersburgh/Berlin site were found to contain concentrations up to 4,200 ppt of PFOA.

The State Superfund Program allows the state to launch investigations of the contamination and hold the parties responsible accountable for the remediation of these sites.

The DEC will work to identify potentially responsible parties that disposed of hazardous wastes and hold them accountable for costs associated with the investigation and remediation.

View the DEC’s letters to the towns here:

Letter to Hoosick Falls Officials

Letter to Petersburgh and Berlin Officials


More Health Harms from PFOA Found

New studies have came out recently that show more harmful effects of PFOA exposure on mothers and their children.

Four studies that have been conducted by Harvard researchers and other leading journals to look into highly fluorinated chemicals such as PFOA.

“These chemicals have some of the strongest bonds in the periodic table, and they basically never break down, so they stay around for millions of years,” said Arlene Blum from the University of California, Berkeley-based Green Science Policy Institute.

Several kinds of cancer, high cholesterol and obesity are some of the harmful health effects associated with PFOA exposure.

It was also found that young children who are exposed to the chemical PFOA have a reduced immune response to vaccinations. Furthermore, as children grow older, they may experience other problems such as more colds and upset stomachs.

Another study discovered that women who had high levels of PFOA in their blood were not able to breastfeed as long as other women.

Learn more here.

Attorneys Stephen Schwarz and Hadley Matarazzo at Faraci Lange, as well as Robin Greenwald at Weitz & Luxenberg, represent the plaintiffs as co-lead counsel in the Hoosick Falls lawsuit.

Senate to Hold PFOA Water Contamination Hearing in Hoosick Falls

The State Senate will be holding a hearing regarding the PFOA water contamination in Hoosick Falls on August 30th.

The hearing will be held at Hoosick Falls High School by the Senate Health and Environmental Conservation committees chaired by Senators Kemp Hannon and Tom O’Mara.

Experts from various agencies including the EPA, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation, and the Department of Health will be present at the hearing.

These experts will shed light on the factors that may have caused the slow response to PFOA contamination in Hoosick Falls’ water supply, such as the possibility of overlapping jurisdictions, lack of communication, or perhaps sheer negligence.

The second part of the hearing will allow the Senators to hear directly prom the public. People who would like to speak can sign up in advance and testify during the afternoon. Committees will allow Hoosick Falls residents to testify on a first-come first-serve basis after 5 PM.

Learn more here.


Leak Forces Petersburgh to Switch Water System to High PFOA-Level Well

Petersburgh PFOA water contaminationOn August 8th the Rensselaer County Department of Health released a statement to the Town of Petersburgh residents that a leak had been identified in the water system that required the activation of Well #2, a well that tested above the federal PFOA advisory level of 70 parts per trillion.

The EPA had recently established a health advisory level of 70 parts per trillion for PFOA.

Consequently, residents were advised by the county and state Departments of Health to continue to, or in some cases revert back to, using bottled water for drinking, cooking, and preparing baby formula.

Bottled water has been made available at the Petersburgh Town Hall while the Departments of Health “work with the Town to correct this situation including the installation of a permanent water treatment system for the municipal supply.”

Read the full article here.

Residents of Petersburgh and other communities who may be impacted by PFOA water contamination are encouraged to contact us to learn more about how we can help.

NYS Updates Hoosick Falls Residents on Blood Tests

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and the Department of Health held a meeting last week to provide Hoosick Falls’ residents with a status update on the PFOA water contamination in the town.

Hoosick Falls PFOA contaminationAfter conducting almost three thousand blood tests in Hoosick Falls, the exposure of the contamination is more clear.

It was found that individuals who use Hoosick Falls village water have, “30 times the amount of PFOA in their blood than the average American.”

It can take anywhere between two to four years for PFOA levels to decrease in the blood system by half.

Those affected are advised to contact a physician after receiving their blood test results as many of the potential side effects of PFOA exposure are treatable.

Read the full story here.