State Orders Pollution Testing at Hoosick Falls Plants

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation recently ordered the longtime Hoosick Falls Company,  Oak Mitsui Inc, and its landlord to check its plants for pollution.

Oak Mitsui has had plants in Hoosick Falls since the 1970s and is now pulling out of the area, with one plant having closed two years ago and a second that will close in January.

The plants produced copper and aluminum foils for smartphones and other electronics.

“As part of the state’s ongoing efforts to address contamination in the Hoosick Falls area, DEC continues to investigate contamination potentially emanating from former Oak Mitsui facilities,” stated DEC spokeswoman Erica Ringewald.

Both of the company’s plants are located on the Hoosic River. The pollution testing will help to determine if the facilities should be added to the state Superfund cleanup program.

The plant that is still currently open was leased by Oak Mitsui from its former owner, Honeywell International. The company’s former site that closed in 2015 is still owned by Oak Mitsui.

Honeywell International signed an agreement with the DEC last week, consenting to examine its open site for pollution, including PFOA.

Oak Mitsui signed a similar agreement with the DEC last month to examine its former facility for PFOA and other pollution.

The agreement also requires the company to turn over its records on plant operations to the DEC, specifically on how hazardous waste was handled at the facility.

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New York Considers Tougher Water Quality Standards

The twelve-member Drinking Water Quality Council held its first meeting today to consider establishing maximum contaminant levels for toxic chemicals in New York State water.

Some say that this rule-making is necessary because of a lack of continuity in the system of federal water quality regulation.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has requested that the council consider setting the maximum contaminant levels for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), as well as perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 1,4-Dioxane.

Brad Hutton, the deputy commissioner of public health for the New York State Department of Health, stated that the council has been given the responsibility on advising the DOH commissioner on what unregulated contaminants should be tested throughout the state.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitors several unregulated contaminants every five years, according to the Safe Drinking Water Act’s guidelines. This leaves gaps in the federal system’s approach of ensuring water quality.

“They have been moving too slow of a pace,” stated Hutton, stressing the state’s need of establishing its own maximum contaminant levels.

Read the full article here.