PFOA Contamination Study Begins In Petersburgh Taconic Plant

More than two years after the Taconic Plastics plant in Petersburgh, New York first alerted the state of concerns about contamination around its Route 22 facility, the company is beginning an in-depth investigation into the extent of PFOA contamination in the area.

Taconic will commence with doing soil tests and installing groundwater wells in order to study the actual extent of PFOA, or perfluorooctanoic acid, contamination.

Following the discovery of PFOA contamination in the Village of Hoosick Falls’ water supply in 2016, Taconic approached the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Health Department regarding previous PFOA contamination at its Petersburgh facility.

Due to major concerns about the negative health effects this PFOA contamination might cause for residents in the years to come, Taconic signed a consent order with New York State requiring the installation of a filtration system on Petersburgh’s municipal water plant. Testing and filtration systems on private wells in the area were also mandated.

In addition, Taconic was required to investigate the scope of the contamination to see how much of the surrounding area had been affected, and to look into ways of remediation.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation recently announced that a report detailing the investigation’s discoveries will be released in 2019.

The DEC stated in its announcement that, “the information collected during the site investigation may also support the conclusion that no action, or no further action, is needed to address site-related contamination.”

There is currently an ongoing class action lawsuit against Taconic that has been filed by Petersburgh residents.

Read the full article here.


Hoosick Falls Votes to Accept Reimbursement from Companies Responsible for PFOA Contamination

Hoosick Falls PFOA contaminationOn Tuesday night, the Hoosick Falls Village Board unanimously voted to accept a $330,250 reimbursement from Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics and Honeywell International for costs to run and maintain the filtration system put in place after the village’s water supply was contaminated with PFOA.

This resolution is not a settlement agreement and so it does not exempt the companies from any future costs and damages.

It’s a huge help to our immediate cash flow. But there are no strings attached. It does not release them from suing them in the future,” stated Hoosick Falls Mayor Robert Allen.

According to Village calculations, Hoosick Falls has spent $707,392.62 due to the chemical PFOA contaminating their water supply. Mayor Allen stresses that they will continue to fight for complete reimbursement from the companies deemed responsible for the contamination.

The filtration system has been in place since 2016 and was paid for by Saint-Gobain and Honeywell. Since then, the energy and labor costs to run and maintain the system have been incurred by the Village.

In a statement, Saint-Gobain’s director of communications Dina Pokedoff said, “Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics and Honeywell have been in continuous dialogue with this administration, as well as the previous administration, to provide reimbursements to the village for the costs it incurred regarding the treatment systems that ensure village residents have access to potable drinking water.”

This resolution has come one year after the Hoosick Falls Village Board voted to reject a $1 million partial settlement agreement with Saint-Gobain and Honeywell due to widespread community opposition.

Read the full story here.


New York Considers Limits on PFOA Contamination in Drinking Water

In an effort to help New York’s Drinking Water Quality Council make recommendations for the maximum legal amount of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the state’s drinking water, the panel recently heard from experts on issues like laboratory methods and water treatment costs.

The panel was created in this year’s state budget and is mandated to make recommendations on contaminant limits by next October. This was the second meeting held by the panel and included statements made by residents of Petersburg and Hoosick Falls. Both communities have suffered from water supplies contaminated by PFOA manufacturers.

While the government and other states have established advisory levels for PFOA and other contaminates in water supplies, there is no law in place that establishes enforceable limits for such contaminates according to state Health Department Deputy Commissioner Brad Hutton. Hutton says the Health Department is going to set a legal enforceable level that all municipal water supplies have to adhere to.

Read the full article here.

For more information about the hearing and the current status of Hoosick Falls’ water contamination problem, click here.

 

 

 

 

Stephen G. Schwarz, Managing Partner of Faraci Lange, is representing plaintiffs in the Hoosick Falls water contamination class action as Co-Lead Counsel with Hadley Matarazzo.


New York Considers Tougher Water Quality Standards

The twelve-member Drinking Water Quality Council held its first meeting today to consider establishing maximum contaminant levels for toxic chemicals in New York State water.

Some say that this rule-making is necessary because of a lack of continuity in the system of federal water quality regulation.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has requested that the council consider setting the maximum contaminant levels for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), as well as perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 1,4-Dioxane.

Brad Hutton, the deputy commissioner of public health for the New York State Department of Health, stated that the council has been given the responsibility on advising the DOH commissioner on what unregulated contaminants should be tested throughout the state.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitors several unregulated contaminants every five years, according to the Safe Drinking Water Act’s guidelines. This leaves gaps in the federal system’s approach of ensuring water quality.

“They have been moving too slow of a pace,” stated Hutton, stressing the state’s need of establishing its own maximum contaminant levels.

Read the full article here.


New Water Quality Council Established and Ready to Address PFOA

Twelve members of a new state Drinking Water Quality Council have been named, preparing the group to hold its first official meeting on October 2nd.

Governor Andrew Cuomo named his four designated council members on Friday. He also announced that the first task of the council will be to recommend maximum contaminant levels for PFOA, among other harmful chemicals.

The council is obligated to return its list of recommended maximum contaminant levels by October 2nd, 2018. The list would then be updated if needed on an annual basis.

“New York is once again stepping up as the federal government continues to ignore its duty to provide clear guidance to protect drinking water quality… Water quality is a national issue that requires consistent national standards, but New York can no longer afford to wait,” stated Governor Cuomo.

Members of the Drinking Water Quality Council include state Health Commissioner Howard Zucker and his designee Deputy Commissioner Brad Hutton, as well as state Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos with his designee Executive Deputy Commissioner Ken Lynch.

Four of the council’s members were recommended by New York State Senate and Assembly leaders, while the other four were designated by Governor Cuomo.

Read the full article here.